Last November, the Trump Administration requested the Supreme Court to expedite and consolidate review of challenges to its decision to terminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. On September 5, 2017, the Trump Administration announced the end of the DACA program, an Obama era executive order that provided certain benefits to some individuals who illegally came to the U.S. before their 16th birthday. To learn more about the DACA program please click here.

The Supreme Court has taken no action so far on the request which means that the Department of Homeland Security will continue to accept DACA renewal applications until further notice. Applications from those who have not previously received DACA benefits are not accepted.  The Court’s next scheduled conference in on February 15th, however, there is indications that the Court’s usual schedule and procedures suggest that arguments will not be heard until next term, which will begin in October 2019. DACA has been a hot issue in the negotiations around the government shutdown, which is now at a record month long. President Trump proposed to continue the DACA and TPS program for the next three years in exchange for $5.7 billion to build a southern border wall. The proposal has been met with opposition from the Democrats. For now, individuals in the country under DACA status can continue to renew their work and travel permits.

To find out more about our immigration and business services, contact Scott Legal, P.C.

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Ian E. Scott, Esq. is the Founder of Scott Legal, P.C. He can be reached at 212-223-2964 or by email at info@legalservicesincorporated.com.


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